Friday, June 16, 2017

Creating Discussion Without Speaking a Word

Creating Discussion 
With this post, I'm exploring Adobe Spark.  You know me, I'm always trying something new.  So for the back story, resources, and more information... click through the Adobe Spark presentation above. 


Now let's talk about having one of the best discussions I've ever allowed my students to have with one another in class... and they did not speak a word.  After completing these amazing Pagoda's in class, I wanted to give the students a chance to do a gallery walk... but better.  I wanted each student to give feedback, to think about the art they were observing.  In turn, every student 'heard' from several viewers their thoughts on the work they created! 


I gave students 5 minutes of uninterrupted critique time.  They were asked to go around the room leaving notes on post-its for as many artworks as they could visit before the time was up.  Because this was the first written critique these students had done, it was important to me that it was only positive.  I also asked every student to sign their initials beside the message they left. They were also asked to move around the room looking for someone who needed a comment, looking for people with a little writing on their comment sheet.  We talked about how there is always something good about every artwork.  Finding the strong parts of an artwork is what makes up better Artist. Finally, I told them, they can not talk while doing this activity.  At the end of the school year, this was the most difficult part of this activity. 


I set the timer and they were off. Students were kind, thoughtful, and respectful of one another.  Their comments were amazing. The details in their writing were fun to look at.  Students walked away with more feedback than I could have ever given them myself.  This was one of the most valuable activities I did this whole last school year.  It's a practice I need to make time for in the short time I have the students in the Art Studio.

2 comments:

  1. Love this! I would like to see more about the original construction of these.

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